Forschung

Archaeological excavations in Bohemian Paradise (Czech Republic)

ERASMUS+ University of Hradec Králové

Weitere Informationen siehe untenstehender Link:

BIP FF UHK

Archaeological excavations in Bohemian Paradise

Two field excavations will be carried out between 18th and 29th July 2022 in Eastern Bohemia (Czech
Republic) under the supervision of members of the Department of archaeology, Philosophical Faculty,
the University of Hradec Králové, Czech Republic (details of the excavations follows). We would like to
invite international students of archaeology to participate in these excavations on the platform of
Erasmus+ Blended Intensive Programmes (BIPs). We aim to create a group of 15 - 20 international
students divided into two subgroups. These subgroups will alternate between the two excavations.
The excavations will be preceded by an online workshop presenting the results of the previous
excavation seasons and the archaeological context of the excavations.
Basic information:
• Organizer: Department of Archaeology, Philosophical Faculty, University of Hradec Králové (CZ
HRADEC01)
• short physical group mobility (12 days) in combination with virtual components
• physical mobility: 18th-29th July 2022
• 5 ECTS
• students of archaeology (BA, MA, Ph.D.) with communication level of English
• Each participant should get from her/his sending institution mobility grant: individual support
is €70 per day.
Shortly about the excavations
Excavation 1: Research of the quadrangular enclosure complex in Markvartice, okr. Jičín
Quadrangular enclouse complex in Markvartice (district Jičín, Czech Republic) represents one of the
few sites of this type known from the territory of the Czech Republic. The period of its origin and
existence falls into the final phase of the Late Iron Age (LT C2-D1; 180-50 BC). It is a multifunctional
super community complex that is associated, among other things, with the residential activities of
members of the social elite of the time. The upcoming excavation season is focused on revising the old
excavation (held in 1969) of the rampart and the completion of the knowledge on constructions built
in the interior of the enclosure. Students will learn the basic excavation procedures, documentation,
sampling, and, if conditions are right, field walking.

Excavation 2: Sandstone abris in Bohemian Paradise
In this part of the field research, students will get acquainted with specific stratigraphies preserved in
the sandstone overhangs of the Bohemian Paradise. Their uniqueness lies in the continuous
sedimentation throughout the entire Holocene and the excellent preservation of the remains of
human activity (fireplaces, structures) and nature (malacofauna, macro-residues, charcoals, etc.).
During the excavations we will move in the valleys of Jordánka creek in a romantic landscape near the
castle Trosky. We will excavate the overhangs of Čin Čan Tau and On The Road with rich Mesolithic
settlements. Students will get acquainted with the methods of detailed research of the Mesolithic in a
stratified situation and the procedures of total sampling of environmental data.

Accommodation
Basic accommodation will be provided in the camp near the archaeological sites. From here, students
will be transported to the exavation sites. Alternatively, in Markvartice site, it is possible to be
accommodated directly on the site, but students need to be equipped with their own tents in this case.
Basic camp facilities (fire pit, grill, cooker, communal tent with seating, mobile toilet) are also built on
site. Hygiene facilities and the possibility of outdoor bathing at the swimming pool are available in the
village of Rakov (about 4 km). The possibility of buying food and hot meals in the pub is offered by the
village of Markvartice (about 3 km)...and if there is time, we also go on trips to the picturesque
landscape of Bohemian Paradise.
Contacts
Mgr. Richard Thér, Ph.D. (richard.ther@uhk.cz)
Application: Mgr. Martina Eliášová (martina.eliasova@uhk.cz)

Forschungsprojekt: World of the Living and World of the Dead: the transformation of Rome’s Pomerium between the 3rd and 4th centuries AD

How was Rome’s ritual boundary, the Pomerium, which separated the world of the living from that of the dead, transformed in the 3rd and 4th centuries AD? This question is crucial for understanding the evolution of the urban space and the rituality in one of Europe’s most influential periods, characterized by the progressive affirmation of Christianity. The Pomerium was a religious and juridical border that surrounded the city of Rome and which, in legal terms, involved its very existence: Rome existed only within its Pomerium; everything beyond was simply territory belonging to Rome. In order to understand the roman late antique Roman Pomerium, urban space and rituality, it is necessary to evaluate its Roman idea, which is highly disputed and needs to be re-evaluated. The POMERIUM project focuses on the environment of the city’s much disputed sacral barrier between the 3rd and the 4th centuries AD. According to Varro, the sacred boundary, originating from an ancient Etruscan ritual, consisted in a circuit (postmoerium) located beyond the heap of earth created by a plough. In contrast, for Festus the Pomerium was a “place” and the word derive from the term for “before the walls”, pro-murium. Livius offers a similar explanation by claiming that the sacred boundary was a space (locus) around the walls (circamoerium) that the Etruscans consecrated after taking the auspices and that was marked by stones and could not be inhabited or ploughed[1]. It is evident that already among the ancient authors the definition and the concept of the Pomerium were very ambiguous[2]. The only certainty is that the Pomerium is the most undefined “boundary” of the ancient world and so important that it was enlarged many times over the centuries, from Titus Tazius to Emperor Aurelianus[3]. Its relevance is due to the fact, recently cast into question, that the Pomerium implicated many juridical and religious restrictions, such as the prohibition on burials within it, on building temples dedicated to Eastern divinities and on entering it when armed, that conditioned in practice the structure of the city and the life of the citizens. All of these implications and consequences and, generally, the topic of the border in the ancient word, have recently been the subject of important international research[4], such as the huge German project “TOPOI”, which deals with the theme of “the borders of Rome”. This is evidence of the importance of this cross-cutting subject, which involves different disciplines such as archaeology, history and anthropology.

 

General objectives

This project will tackle the issues of the evolution and the tradition of the Pomerium, its extension, its legal and religious values, and its possible ending at the end of the 4th century AD, which is – as a working hypothesis – determined by the ban on pagan cults under Theodosius I. The era in focus comprises approximately 150 years and covers mainly the period between the decades before the construction of the Aurelian Wall (AD 270/275), recently debated in literature as being identical with the Pomerium, and the issuing of the “Theodosian decrees” (AD 389-392), which traditionally mark the end of pagan rites. Direct archaeological or epigraphical evidence to identify the Pomerium of these centuries is absent: there are no cippi or boundary stones marking the line of the Pomerium of the 3rd and 4th centuries AD. For this reason, all possible archaeological and historical data will be taken into account that could indicate the life and the possible transformation of the sacred boundary. Based on the assumption revealed from earlier studies dealing with the Pomerium in Roman Imperial times, burials are among the most indicative references to identify its course, because the Pomerium limited, with exceptions, the expansion of cemeteries, from the Republican time on, through the formulation of the law of the 12 tables, with the exemption of burials for special persons, including the Imperial families. In this tradition, this new examination will focus mainly on the analysis of the spatial distribution of all burial sites built or still in use in the period in Rome. Since the Pomerium also implied the exclusion of oriental cults, in general non-Italic rituals, within its circuit, these too will be taken into consideration. One innovative way to further explore the question of the Pomerium will focus on the study of the distribution of early Christian churches and synagogues and their cemeteries. With the 3rd and 4th centuries being the crucial moment for the affirmation of Christianity and the Jewish religion, a model of the distribution of places of cults and Christian and Jewish cemeteries will, without doubt, contribute to our understanding of the ritual and of the sacred space in Rome in this period, and to a possible connection with the Pomerium: if the Pomerium remains a sacred pagan limit, it is also important to ask whether churches and synagogues and places of non-pagan worship could transgress it or not. In order to properly deal with the complex nature of the main theme “Pomerium in Late Antiquity”, I intend to tackle the project by answering the following questions, the core of the project:

1: Is there evidence of a Pomerium in late antique Rome?

2: If yes, did the Pomerium coincide with the Aurelian Walls?

3: How was it transformed between the 3rd and 4th centuries AD?

4: What effect did the Pomerium have on rituality and urban space in Rome, including for the Christian and Jewish faiths?

Based on these questions, I will create a GIS map of Rome, with a related open data database, recording all pagan, Christian and Jewish burial places newly built or still in use (e.g. family burials) between the 3rd and 4th centuries AD within the Roman necropolises, which will also include all contextually significant funerary inscriptions from this period and places of worship with the aim of investigating the spatial relation with the Aurelian walls and identifying the possible location by analyzing patterns of sacred, public and burial space. The focal point of a spatial approach is the idea that the Pomerium defines both a limit and a sacred space at the same time, dividing different urban spaces.

 

Objectives of the DAAD Research Grant

During the DAAD research grant at the Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz within the Institute of Christliche Archäologie und Byzantinische Kunstgeschichte with the supervision of Prof. Vasiliki Tsamakda, I am focusing on the analysis of the conception of sacred space and "borders" between Christian and Jewish culture. This specific study will certainly make possible to better understand the late antique Pomerium, rituality and urbans space of Rome and will provide the necessary basis for undertaking the entire project, explained previously. This research is also taking place throughout the support of the Römisch- Germanisches Zentralmuseum libraries which have a large number of books that are fundamental to my research.

The concept of "sacred space" is an extremely complex, especially as regards the late antique period, a moment of transformation, characterized by important political, economic, social, and religious changes and characterized by the coexistence of three different communities, that pagan, Christian and Jewish.
The theme of "sacred space" is also directly connected with the issue of the "borders", which precisely define sacred and profane space and public and private space and finally urban and suburban spaces, influencing the topography of the city.
The boundaries that defined the urban and suburban space of late antique Rome are the urban walls and the Pomerium. The walls, with a purely defensive purpose, were immediately perceptible in the urban landscape; the Pomerium instead, which is the most important sacral-juridical boundary, was less recognizable in the territory, but until the period of Hadrian its path was marked by boundary stones placed at a regular distance.
There is still a great debate on the nature of the Pomerium, but for some authors it can be interpreted as a "space" consecrated by rituals, necessary for the definition of the sacred space of the urbs and not-sacred of the Suburbium, where some practices could be carried out and others not.
Therefore, the definition of borders, the cultural perception of sacred and non-sacred spaces and the rules to be followed, determined the living of the citizen within the urban and suburban territory.
An important prohibition determined by the sacral boundary of the Pomerium since the Republican period consisted in the prohibition of burial within it. It was a prohibition that was always respected, albeit with some controversial exceptions.
The situation becomes extremely more complicated during the Late Antiquity starting with the construction of the Aurelian Walls which in fact caused a fundamental change in the layout of the city, defining a new urban space and suburban space.

The general purpose of this scholarship is to carry out a preliminary analysis regarding the different conception of sacred space during the late antique period inside the three different coexisting communities, the pagan, Christian and Jewish ones which will allow a better understanding of the nature and value of the late antique roman Pomerium and its possible coincidence with the Aurelian Walls.
The late antique period is strongly characterized by a mixture of different religions, cultures and beliefs. In reality, Roman society has always shown a strong trend towards multiculturalism, incorporating and re-elaborating within it the uses, customs and traditions of the subjugated peoples.
Within such a complex, multicultural, multi-religious society, very similar to modern society, the coexistence between the different communities must have been complex, also in the same cultural environment. So, what happens when we talk about "sacred space"?
Is it possible to identify a multiple definition and conception of sacred space corresponding to the three different communities? And what was the effect on the late antique topography of the city?
The preliminary result of the research shows a different conception of the sacred space.
In pagan culture, it generally coincides with the entire territory of the city (urbs), which is sacred as it is delimited by the Pomerium and the city walls which are res sacrae and in which it could not be buried as the dead corpse was considered impure.
Instead, within the Christian and Jewish communities the sacred space is not so much connected with the territory of the city, at least until the fifth century AD. when even the walls are sanctified in a "Christian" way, but with the individual places of worship (domus ecclesiae, tituli, synagogue) that also coincide with the cemeteries, where the martyrs where buried.
For the Christian the presence of the martyrs but also carrying out of the rituals within it made this place “sacred”.
Instead, for the Jewish, holy places were the synagogues that constituted the focal point of the life of the community, because they are space dedicated to pray toward the God, which in the Jewish language is also indicated with a name “Maqom” that means also “place”.

Therefore, this research is providing interesting new ideas concerning an extremely complez topic t of the conception of the sacred space, as in general was the late antique multicultural and multi religious roman society.


[1] Varr., Ling. 5.143; Fest., 294, 295.; Liv., ab Urbe condita, 1.44. 4-5.

[2] Suet, in Roth, p. 313; Aulus Gellius, Noctes Atticae, XIII, 14, 1-3; Schol. Inv. 9.11.3; [2] Corp. Agrim. Rom. I.1, 64.

[3] Liv., ab Urbe condita, 1.44.3; Tac., Ann. 12.23; Plut., Rom. 2.2-4; Cass.Dio, 43.50.1; Hist. Aug. Aurel.21.9.11; Gell.13.14.2; Tac. Ann. 12.24; Gell.13.14.2; Plut., Rom. 2.2-4; Liv., ab Urbe condita, 1.44.3; Tac., Ann. 12.23; Cass.Dio, 43.50.1; Cass. Dio 44.498.1; Tac., Ann. 12.23; Cass. Dio, 55.6.6; Tac. Ann. 12.23; Gell. 13.14.7; Hist. Aug. Aurel.21.9.11.

[4] KOORTBOJIAN 2020; DUBBINI 2018.

Ph.D. Jorge LÓPEZ QUIROGA

Ph.D. Jorge LÓPEZ QUIROGA

Doctor in Medieval History (University of Paris-Sorbonne, Paris IV, 1997); Doctor in Geography and History (University of Santiago de Compostela, USC, 1997), and European Doctor (USC). He develops his teaching and research work at the Autonomous University of Madrid (UAM) since 2002; having previously been Assistant at the University of Paris IV (Paris-Sorbonne) (1990-1995), Professor of Medieval History at the University of La Rochelle (1997-1999) and of Ancient History at the University of Alcalá de Henares (1999-2002). Former Member of the Casa de Velázquez (School of Higher Hispanic Studies) and a fellow of the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation, among other various post-doctoral research grants, including at the Austrian Academy of Sciences and the ‘Max Planck Institute of History’ in Göttingen (Germany). He has been visiting professor at various universities (Toulouse, Bordeaux, Coimbra, Porto, Berlin, Venice, Siena, Rome, Florence, EPHE-Paris, Rio de Janeiro and Buenos Aires). Between 2004 and 2008 he was Director of the ‘Spanish Archaeological Mission’ in Conimbriga (Portugal). He is also an Associate Professor at the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Member of the ‘National Society of Antiquaries of France’, based in the Louvre Museum (Paris); Associate Member of the Centre Michel de Boüard (CRAHAM, Uni. Caen-Normandie/CNRS). He has directed, as principal investigator, a score of national and international scientific projects. He is the author of close to twenty monographs, as author, editor and/or coordinator, as well as more than a hundred long articles, book chapters and publications in Proceedings of National and International Scientific Congresses. He was also curator of the exhibition ‘In Tempore Sueborum. The time of the Suevi in ​​Gallaecia (411-585). The first medieval kingdom of the West’.

Forschungsaufenthalt an der Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz bis Ende April 2021

Forschungsprojekt: Das spanische Felsenkloster San Pedro de Rocas

 

 

 

Veröffentlicht am | Veröffentlicht in Forschung

Forschungsprojekt: Das spanische Felsenkloster San Pedro de Rocas

RESEARCH PROJECT: The byzantine influence on Late Antique and Early Medieval Rupestrian Monasticism in the Iberian Peninsula. Architecture, Archaeology and Liturgy in the monastery of St. Pedro of Rocas (Galicia, Spain).

Senior Researcher Ph.D. Jorge LÓPEZ QUIROGA

St Pedro of Rocas is one of the emblematic places of the so-called Ribeira Sacra territory (in Galicia, Iberian Peninsula). In the framework of a transdisciplinary research project in progress (starting in 2018) and through analytical techniques applied to Cultural Heritage (Archeometry, Info-Architecture, 3D representation, Archaeology of Architecture, Laboratory Analysis Techniques, Aerospace Remote Sensing and GIS) we are getting a very different image regarding the one through the investigations carried out until now about this unique place. St. Pedro of Rocas is in its first phase an architectural complex known as lavra, consist of a large area with defined spaces, cells and access zones that make up the housing area as well as a church, the ecclesia with liturgical and devotional function and an area destined for burials. Belonging to this first phase of the complex we have documented very singular architectural elements as: hagioscopes for liturgical use, funerary chapels and arcosolia with a devotional and memorial character, cells cut and carved in the rock with a specific technology and a set of utilitarian and symbolic elements (such as channels, silos, stairs, passage areas, access terraces and platforms). The presence of the hagioscopes, the side chapels (paraecclesiae), as well as the internal spatial distribution of the complex in its initial phase, can only be justified in the context of a Byzantine liturgy. In our opinion, this influence could have even been exerted directly by the presence in St. Pedro of Rocas of individuals (whether they were initially hermits and anchorites or not) from the East (and specifically from Cappadocia, Syria or Egypt). It is also necessary to highlight the presence of a significant number of inscriptions and graffiti that are under study. The light, in their exact orientation of the construction and the design of the space, based on the acoustics and the visibility of the interior of the ecclesia and paraecclesiae, make the rupestrian complex a place completely organized, planned and executed by master builders. It is necessary to emphasize that in St. Pedro of Rocas we have a ‘sacred natural space’ built and adapted for a cult, funerary and housing-settlement use. The nature and the orography of this singular place are very similar to the so-called 'sacred mountain' (in Sinai, Egypt), therefore it was chosen as the place of settlement of the hermits in the Late Antiquity. Later, in the Early Middle Ages, this place was transformed thanks to an architecture cut and carved in the rock by the ‘holy men’ to become a big rupestrian worship complex and settlement that acquires the character of a 'holy place'. St Pedro de Rocas is not a church with three chapels, as it has been defended so far, but it is a single-nave ecclesia, with two funeral chapels (paraecclesiae) on both sides, communicated by small corridors carved into the rock, today closed. The ecclesia is distributed in three spaces: a kind of narthex, a presbytery-choir, and a sanctuary, all separated by wooden structures (gates and iconostases). We consider that St. Pedro of Rocas is an example of a Byzantine influence (direct or indirect), probably also existing in other rupestrian worship spaces in the Iberian Peninsula, visible in an architecture determined by a liturgy of Eastern origin.

Forschungsprojekt: Der byzantinische Einfluss auf die spätantiken und frühmittelalterlichen Felsenklöster auf der Iberischen Halbinsel. Architektur, Archäologie und Liturgie im Kloster San Pedro de Rocas (Galicien, Spanien).

 Das Kloster San Pedro de Rocas ist eines der charakteristischen Sakralorte der sog. Ribeira Sacra Region (dt. Heiliges Uferland) in Galicien auf der Iberischen Halbinsel. Im Kontext eines interdisziplinären Forschungsprojekts (Beginn 2018), in dem verschiedenste wissenschaftliche, für Stätten kulturellen Erbes praktikable Untersuchungstechnologien angewendet wurden (Archäometrie, Informationsarchitektur, 3D-Präsentationen, Architekturarchäologie, Laboranalysen, Fernerkundungstechnologien und das Geoinformationssystem GIS) konnte durch die bisher unternommenen Analysen ein sehr differenziertes Bild über diesen einzigartigen Ort, San Pedro de Rocas, erstellt werden. San Pedro de Rocas ist in der ersten Bauphase ein architektonischer Komplex, als lavra bekannt, der aus einem großen Areal mit festgelegten Räumen besteht, aus Zellen und Eingangsbereichen im Wohntrakt, aus einer Kirche, der ecclesia, für Liturgie und Gebet und einem Gelände für Begräbnisse. Für diese erste Bauphase konnten einzigartige Architekturelemente dokumentiert werden wie Hagioskope (Maueröffnungen) für den liturgischen Gebrauch, Grabkapellen und arcosolia für Verehrungs- und Kommemorialriten, Zellen, die mit einer speziellen Technik in den Fels gehauen oder geschnitten wurden, und viele Elemente mit Nutz- und Symbolcharakter (wie Zufahrtswege, Vorratsgebäude, Treppen, Durchgangsbereiche, Zugangsareale und Plattformen). Das Vorhandensein von Hagioskopen, von Seitenkapellen (parecclesiae), wie auch die interne Raumaufteilung des Komplexes in seiner Anfangsphase können nur im Kontext der byzantinischen Liturgie erklärt werden. Unserer Meinung nach kann dieser Einfluss durch die Anwesenheit von Mönchen in San Pedro de Roca (Eremiten oder Anachoriten) erklärt werden, die aus dem Osten, speziell aus Kappadokien, Syrien oder Ägypten, kamen. Auch ist es wichtig, die bereits begonnenen Studien zu einer bedeutenden Anzahl von Inschriften und Graffiti weiter zu vertiefen. Einblicke in die genauen Umstände der Entstehung und Ausgestaltung des Klosterkomplexes, basierend auf den akustischen und visuellen Gegebenheiten des Innenraums der ecclesia und der parecclesiae, lassen erkennen, dass das Felsenklosterareal ein Ort ist, der von Meisterarchitekten genaustens organisiert, durchgeplant und ausgeführt wurde. Es ist wichtig zu bemerken, dass wir in San Pedro de Rocas das Ambiente eines “natürlichen heiligen Raum“ haben, gebaut und angepasst für die Ausübung des Kultes, für Begräbnisse und für die Unterbringung der Mönche. Die Natur und die Orographie dieses einzigartigen Ortes weisen Ähnlichkeiten mit dem sog. Heiligen Berg, dem Sinai in Ägypten, auf. Deswegen wurde der Platz in der Spätantike von Eremiten als Siedlungsort ausgewählt, da er die Kriterien eines Heiligen Ortes erfüllte. Später, im frühen Mittelalter, wurde das Areal von den „Heiligen Männern“ durch die in den Fels gehauene und geschnittene Architektur verändert und so zu einem Felsenklosterkomplex und zu einem Ort, der dem Charakter einer „Heiliger Stätte“ entsprach. San Pedro de Rocas ist keine Kirche mit drei Kapellen, wie es bisher angenommen wurde, sondern eine Einraumkirche (ecclesia) mit zwei Grabkapellen (parecclesiae) an beiden Seiten, verbunden durch kleine, in den Fels geschnittene, heute verschlossene Gänge. Die ecclesia hat drei Raumteile: eine Art Narthex, einen Altarraum und ein Sanktuarium, alle untergeteilt durch hölzerne Abtrennungen (Türen oder Ikonostase). Wir vermuten, dass die Baustruktur von San Pedro de Roca direkt oder indirekt von Byzanz beeinflusst wurde, was auch in anderen Felsenklöstern der Iberischen Halbinsel zu vermuten ist, sichtbar in einer durch die ostkirchliche Liturgie geprägten Architektur.

Veröffentlicht am | Veröffentlicht in Forschung

Dr. Michelle Beghelli

Michelle Beghelli

Michelle Beghelli graduated in Early Byzantine Archaeology from the University of Bologna and acquired her PhD in Vor- und Frühgeschichte at the University of Mainz. Her thesis «From the quarry to the church. The economics of Early Medieval stone architectural sculpture: materials, makers and patrons (7th-9th centuries)» was awarded the Leibniz-GemeinschaftDissertation Prize 2020. She received doctoral and post-doctoral fellowships, has worked in international research projects, participated in conferences in several European Countries, and authored and co-edited a number of scientific papers and books. Within our Department, thanks to the support of the DFG programme «Initiation of International Collaboration / Aufbau internationaler Kooperationen», she established a scientific partnership with Italian and Czech colleagues, aimed at the preparation of a comprehensive research project on Sicilian catacombs.

mibeghel@uni-mainz.de

https://avh.academia.edu/MichelleBeghelli

Michelle Beghelli studierte christliche und frühbyzantinische Archäologie an der Universität Bologna und promovierte an der JGU Mainz in der Vor- und Frühgeschichte. Ihre Dissertation «From the quarry to the church. The economics of Early Medieval stone architectural sculpture: materials, makers and patrons (7th-9th centuries)» wurde mit dem Promotionspreis der Leibniz-Gemeinschaft 2020 ausgezeichnet. Sie erhielt verschiedene Doc- und Postdoc-Förderungen, arbeitete an internationalen Forschungsprojekten mit, nahm an zahlreichen Tagungen in unterschiedlichen europäischen Ländern teil und ist Autorin und Mitherausgeberin mehrerer Monographien und Aufsätze. In Kooperation mit unserem Arbeitsbereich und dank der Unterstützung durch das DFG-Programm „Aufbau internationaler Kooperationen” konnte eine Partnerschaft mit italienischen und tschechischen WissenschaftlernInnen mit dem Ziel der Vorbereitung eines umfassenden Forschungsprojekts zu den sizilianischen Katakomben aufgebaut werden.

mibeghel@uni-mainz.de

https://avh.academia.edu/MichelleBeghelli

 

 

Veröffentlicht am

Forschungsprojekt: Katakomben auf Sizilien

Eine einzigartige Landschaft mit einer einzigartigen Geschichte

Die Katakomben und ihr Umfeld im Südosten von Sizilien (4. - 9. Jh.)

Unsere Abteilung beginnt ein internationales kooperatives Projekt über die spätantiken Katakomben auf Sizilien, ihren Kontext, ihre Nutzung und ihre spätere Wiederverwendung. Ziel ist die jährliche Weiterführung der Ausgrabungen, und die Organisationeines umfassenden und interdisziplinären Forschungsprojekts.

Der Call for Applications für die diesjährige Ausgrabungssaison (03.10.2022 – 04.12.2022) ist nun eröffnet. Die Einsendefrist endet am 30.04.2022. Beeilen Sie sich, es gibt nur wenige Plätze!

Die Katakomben im Südosten von Sizilien

In der Provinz von Ragusa, im Südosten von Sizilien, sind hunderte von Grabstellen bekannt, verteilt auf unzählige Katakomben, bestehend aus Höhlen, die in die kalkhaltigen Felsformationen dieser Region eingehauen sind. Diese ungewöhnlichen Orte machen die Provinz Ragusa zu einem einzigartigen Landstrich innerhalb Europas, nicht nur aufgrund ihrer hohen Konzentration, sondern auch wegen ihres besonderen historischen Kontextes. Von der Spätantike bis ins frühe Mittelalter haben die verschiedenstenVölker mit unterschiedlichen Kulturen und Sprachen dieses Gebiet beherrscht, bewohnt bzw. mitbewohnt: spätrömische, germanische, byzantinische und arabische Bevölkerungsgruppen. Zusätzlich war das Territorium um Ragusa ein umkämpftes Grenzgebiet zwischen dem vandalischen Königreich, dem Römischen Reich und Odoakers italienischem Königreich.

Die größten Katakomben haben eine sehr weite Ausdehnung und weisen charakteristische architektonische Strukturen auf mit Haupt- und Nebengängen und kleinen und größeren säulengestützten Kammern, die teilweise mit skulpturalen Dekorationen und Inschriften versehen oder in denen Spuren von Bemalung erhalten geblieben sind. Die Grabstellen, die in den vorhandenen Fels gehauen wurden, bedecken entweder in Form von Grabsteinen den Boden oder, in unterschiedlichen Schichten, die gesamte Wand vom Boden bis zur Decke. Es gibt ebenso Gräber der privilegierten Bevölkerungsschicht mit baldachinartigen Überbauten, oder Arkosolien, oder schmale überwölbte Kammern als Bestattungsort für zwei oder vier Verstorbene.

Forschungsarbeiten an den Katakomben und ihrem Kontext

Bis jetzt ist die Kenntnislage über diese Region eher dürftig, da bisher auch nur wenig Fläche ausgegraben wurde. Die verfügbaren Daten rekrutieren überwiegend aus grundlegenden graphischen Dokumentationen und Zeichnungen, die bei gelegentlichen Oberflächen-Surveys angefertigt wurden. So gibt es bis jetzt keine umfassende Studie zu diesem einmaligen Gebiet: es ist sogar unmöglich die genaue Anzahl der Katakomben und Grabstätten zu bestimmen, welche aller Wahrscheinlichkeit höher ist als bisher angenommen. Die exakte Position und die Gesamtmenge von Grabfeldern und Gräbern muss systematisch erfasst werden, als auch die Form und die originalen Baustrukturen und die verschiedenen Bau- und Grablegungsperioden. Weitere grundlegende, die Katakomben betreffende Aspekte bedürfen einer genauen Betrachtung, wie Ausgrabungstechnik oder der ökonomische Kontext der Handwerker, die die jeweilige Sektor tätig waren, die Definition und Entwicklungsstrategien der Begräbnisareale sowie deren spätere Wiederverwendung als Unterkünfte oder Viehställe, die Identifizierung und soziale Zuordnung der Grabbesitzer, die Bedeutung der Katakomben für die Landschaft, ihre räumliche Beziehung zu anderen zeitgleichen Ansiedlungen (Dörfern oder oberirdischen Friedhöfen usw.), die Infrastrukturen (Straßen, Wasserressourcen, Häfen, Märkte) und die unmittelbare Umgebung dieser Begräbnisareale usw.

Diese und viele andere Punkte werden erwartungsgemäß im Fokus einer großangelegten, teilweise schon in Vorbereitung begriffenen Untersuchung stehen, die mit der dem Landesamt für Archäologie und Denkmalpflege Siziliens und der Universität von Hradec Králové in der Tschechischen Republik zusammenarbeitet. 2020 hat das von der DFG geförderte Programm “Aufbau internationaler Kooperationen” es möglich gemacht, Kontakte aufzubauen und vorbereitende Kooperationsmaßnahmen mit unseren internationalen Partnern abzuschließen. 2021 hat die Alexander von Humboldt-Stiftung dem Projekt eine Finanzierung innerhalb des Programms zur Förderung von Kooperationspartnerschaften (Research Group Linkage Programme) zur Verfügung gestellt. Dank dieses Programms wird unsere Abteilung und die Abteilung für Archäologie der Hradec Králové-Universität die gemeinsame Zusammenarbeit vertiefen, ihre Forschungs- und Grabungsaktivitäten fortsetzen, und die nächsten Phasen der wissenschaftlichen Arbeit, die in den kommenden Jahren durchgeführt werden wird vorbereiten und weiterentwickeln.

Neue archäologische Ausgrabungen

Unter archäologischem und historischem Blickpunkt ist die massive Präsenz von Katakomben in ländlichen Gebieten ein weiteres außergewöhnliches Charakteristikum der Ragusa-Region. Ein eindrückliches Beispiel, schon allein durch seine Größe und archäologische Bedeutung, findet sich in Scorrione, in der Nähe von Modica. Im Oktober und November 2020 unternahm die Universität Hradec Králové die erste Ausgrabungskampagne, während die Teilnahme der Johannes Gutenberg-Universität an den archäologischen Grabungen 2021 begann. Eine daraus aufbauende stratigraphische Abfolge für die Entstehung, den Gebrauch der Grabkammern und ihre spätere Auflassung konnte so rekonstruiert werden. Diese Art der Datenerfassung für Katakomben im ländlichen Bereich ist praktisch einzigartig und zeigt das noch auszuschöpfende Potential für die weitere Erforschung dieses Areals, welches eine weitere Anzahl von Hypogäen einschließt, die einer systematischen archäologischen Untersuchung bedürfen. Die Kampagne führte auch zur Entdeckung und Aufnahme von verschiedenen architektonischen Strukturen, welche in die natürlichen Felswände hineingebaut oder gehauen wurden, als auch von Fragmenten bemalten Mörtels und Stucks und von sehr gut erhaltenen Gräbern mit sterblichen Überresten, überwiegend in das 5. und 6. Jh. n. Chr. datiert. Diese Ergebnisse erlauben ein besseres Verständnis für die ursprüngliche Organisation der Katakomben und ihrer ursprünglichen Erscheinungsformen.

JGU Studierende auf Sizilien

Die nächste, zweimonatige archäologische Grabungssaison wird vom 02.10.2022 (Ankunft) bis zum 04.12.2022 (Abreise) dauern. Der Call for Applications ist hiermit eröffnet! Einsendeschluss: 30.04.2022. Anträge, die nach diesem Datum eintreffen werden nicht mehr berücksichtigt.

Wir suchen:

  • BA-, MA- und PhD-Studenten, die im Rahmen des Erasmus Plus-Programms (Erasmus Praktikum) an den Ausgrabungen teilnehmen. Dauer des Aufenthalts: Zwei Monate. Stipendium: ca. 1400 € gesamt (umfasst Unterkunft und Reisekosten).  Weitere Informationen hier, Antragsstellung hier.
  • BA-, MA- und PhD-Studenten zur kürzeren Teilnahme. Dauer des Aufenthalts: drei Wochen (in Ausnahmen können auch Anträge für einen zwei-wöchigen Aufenthalt berücksichtigt werden). Teilweise Erstattung der Ausgaben durch die Abteilung. Zwei Phasen: erste: 17.10.2022 – 06.11.2022; zweite: 07.11.2022 – 27.11.2022. Weitere Informationen hier, Antragsstellung hier.

Innerhalb des Auswahlprozesses werden Studierende, die sich im Rahmen eines Erasmus Plus-Programms bewerben, bevorzugt berücksichtigt.

Kontakte

Michelle Beghelli

mibeghel@uni-mainz.de

Univ.-Prof. Dr. Vasiliki Tsamakda

tsamakda@uni-mainz.de

A unique landscape with a unique history.

Catacombs and their settlements in South-Eastern Sicily (4th-9th c.)

Our Department started an international collaboration on Late Antique catacombs in Sicily, their context, use and reuse over time, aiming at joining the yearly archaeological excavations, and organising a comprehensive and interdisciplinary research project.

 The call for applications for this year’s campaign (03.10.22 – 04.12.2022) is now open. Deadline: 30.04.2022. Hurry up, there are just a few places! Further information below.

             Catacombs in South-Eastern Sicily

In the province of Ragusa, South-Eastern Sicily, are known hundreds of graves distributed in a myriad of catacombs, all hollowed out in the ubiquitous calcareous rock-faces and outcrops of the region. This corresponds to a unique landscape in Europe, not only because of the concentration of this kind of sites, but also because of the exceptional historical context. From Late Antiquity to the Early Middle Ages, many different populations, with quite different cultures and languages, have ruled, inhabited and cohabited in the area: the Late Roman and Germanic peoples, the Byzantines and the Arabs; in addition, the Ragusa territory was a disputed borderland between the Vandal kingdom, the Roman Empire and Odoacer's kingdom of Italy.

The biggest catacombs extend over very large areas and are characterised by remarkably elaborate architectural structures, with several primary and secondary corridors, small and large columned chambers (at times provided with sculpted decoration and inscriptions, or showing traces of painting), and burials excavated all over the available rock-surfaces, from those that covered the floors in a reticulate of gravestones to those, in different layers, that exploited the walls from top to bottom. Privileged graves are also present, enhanced by baldachin-like structures or arcosolia, or gathered in groups of two or four in separated small vaulted chambers.

            Research on the catacombs and their context

Yet the current knowledge of these sites is still poor, as only a few have been excavated. The available data mostly derive from basic graphic documentation and sketches, made in occasion of preliminary surface-surveys. So far, no comprehensive study of this extraordinary territory has been carried out: at present, it is not even possible to determine precisely the overall number of catacombs and burials, which is in all likelihood much higher than previously estimated. The exact position and number of sites and graves need to be systematically recorded, as well as the form and original levels of the structures and the different building- and burying-periods. Further crucial aspects related to the catacombs also need thorough examination, such as the excavation techniques and the economic context of the craftsmen who operated in this sector, the definition and management of spaces and their later reuse as dwellings or cattle-shelters, the identification and social characterisation of the users, the role of the catacombs in the landscape, their spatial relations with other coeval sites (settlements, open-field cemeteries, etc.) and infrastructures (roads, water sources, ports, markets), the immediate surroundings of these funerary sites, and so forth.

These and several other points will expectedly represent the focus of a large research project, currently in preparation, in cooperation with the State Agency for Archaeological and Cultural Heritage, Sicily, and the University of Hradec Králové, Czech Republic. In 2020, the DFG programme «Initiation of International Collaboration / Aufbau internationaler Kooperationen» has made possible to establish contacts and reach a preparatory cooperation agreement with our international partners. In 2021, the Alexander von Humboldt-Stiftung granted us funds within the Research Group Linkage Programme (Programm zur Förderung von Institutspartnerschaften). Thanks to this Programme, in 2022 and 2023, our Department and the Department of Archaeology of Hradec Králové will strengthen cooperation, continue their research and fieldwork activities, and prepare and develop the next phases of the scientific work, to be carried out in the next years.

             New archaeological excavations

Under an archaeological and historical viewpoint, another extraordinary characteristic of the Ragusa region is the massive presence of catacombs in rural districts. One of the most significant ones, as for its size and archaeological potential, is in Scorrione, near Modica. In October and November 2020, the University of Hradec Králové carried out the first archaeological campaign, while the participation of the Johannes Gutenberg University to the archaeological excavations started in 2021. A consistent stratigraphic sequence for the foundation and use of the funerary chambers and their later abandonment has been thus reconstructed. This kind of data is virtually unique for catacombs in rural context, and speaks eloquently on the potentialities of the site, which includes a number of funerary chambers still awaiting systematic archaeological investigation. The campaign also led to the discovery and recording of various architectural structures carved or set on the natural rock walls, as well as fragments of painted mortar and plaster and well-preserved graves with their deposits, mostly dating to the 5th and 6th century AD. This allows a far better understanding of the original organisation of the catacombs and their original visual appearance.

JGU students in Sicily

            The next archaeological campaign will take place along two months, from 02.10.2022 (arrival date) to 04.12.2022 (departure date). The call for applications is now open! Deadline: 30.04.2022. Applications arriving after this date will not be considered.

We are looking for:

  •  BA, MA and PhD students, participating to the excavation within the Erasmus Plus Programme (Erasmus Praktikum). Length of the stay: 2 months. Scholarship: ca. 1.400 € in total (covers accommodation and transport). Further information here, application form here.
  • BA, MA and PhD students participating for shorter periods. Length of the stay: 3 weeks (exceptionally, we can consider applications for 2 weeks). Partial reimbursement of the expenses provided by the Department. Two shifts: 1st period 17.10.2022 – 06.11.2022; 2nd period 07.11.2022 – 27.11.2022. Further information here, application form here.

Within the selection process, students applying for the Erasmus Plus Programme will be given priority.

Contacts

Michelle Beghelli

mibeghel@uni-mainz.de

Univ.-Prof. Dr. Vasiliki Tsamakda

tsamakda@uni-mainz.de

 

 

Veröffentlicht am

Forschungsprojekt: Katakomben auf Sizilien

A unique landscape with a unique history.

Catacombs and their settlements in South-Eastern Sicily (4th-9th c.)

Our Department is starting an international collaboration on Late Antique catacombs in Sicily, their context, use and reuse over time, aiming at joining the archaeological excavations currently in progress, and organising a comprehensive and interdisciplinary research project.

Catacombs in South-Eastern Sicily

In the province of Ragusa, South-Eastern Sicily, are known hundreds of graves distributed in a myriad of catacombs, all hollowed out in the ubiquitous calcareous rock-faces and outcrops of the region. This corresponds to a unique landscape in Europe, not only because of the concentration of this kind of sites, but also because ofthe exceptional historical context. From Late Antiquity to the Early Middle Ages, many different populations, with quite different cultures and languages, have ruled, inhabited and cohabited in the area: the Late Roman and Germanic peoples, the Byzantines and the Arabs; in addition, the Ragusa territory was a disputed borderland between the Vandal kingdom, the Roman Empire and Odoacer's kingdom of Italy.

The biggest catacombs extend over very large areas and are characterised by remarkably elaborate architectural structures, with several primary and secondary corridors, small and large columned chambers (at times provided with sculpted decoration and inscriptions, or showing traces of painting), and burials excavated all over the available rock-surfaces, from those that covered the floors in a reticulate of gravestones to those, in different layers, that exploited the walls from top to bottom. Privileged graves are also present, enhanced by baldachin-like structures or arcosolia, or gathered in groups of two or four in separated small vaulted chambers.

Research on the catacombs and their context

Yet the current knowledge of these sites is still poor, as only a few have been excavated. The available datamostlyderive from basic graphic documentation and sketches, made in occasion ofpreliminary surface-surveys. So far, no comprehensive study of this extraordinary territory has been carried out: at present, it is not even possible to determine precisely the overall number of catacombs and burials, which is in all likelihood much higher than previously estimated. The exact position and amount of sites and gravesneed to be systematically recorded, as well as the form and original levels of the structures and the different building- and burying-periods. Further crucial aspects related to the catacombs also need thorough examination, such as the excavation techniques and the economic context of the craftsmen who operated in this sector, the definition and management of spaces and their later reuse as dwellings or cattle-shelters, the identification and social characterisation of the users, the role of the catacombs in the landscape, their spatial relations with other coeval sites (settlements, open-field cemeteries, etc.) and infrastructures (roads, water sources, ports, markets), the immediate surroundings of these funerary sites, and so forth.

These and several other points will expectedly represent the focus of a large research project, currently in preparation, in cooperation with the State Agency for Archaeological and Cultural Heritage, Sicily, and the University of Hradec Králové, Czech Republic.The DFG programme «Initiation of International Collaboration / Aufbau internationalerKooperationen» has made possible to establish contacts and reach a preparatory cooperation agreement with our international partners.

 New archaeological excavations

Under an archaeological and historical viewpoint, another extraordinary characteristic of the Ragusa region is the massive presence of catacombs in rural districts. One of the most significant ones, as for its size and archaeological potential, is in Scorrione, near Modica. In October and November 2020, the University of Hradec Králové carried out the first archaeological campaign, focusing on the cluster formed by thehypogea D and E. The main tasks consisted in the stratigraphic excavation of the whole hypogeum D, both outside and inside the main funerary chamber. A consistent stratigraphic sequence for the foundation and use of the site and its later abandonment has been thus reconstructed. This kind of data is virtually unique for catacombs in rural context, and speaks eloquently on the potentialities of the site, which includes a number ofadditional hypogea still awaiting systematic archaeological investigation. The campaign also led to the discovery and recording of various architectural structures carved or set on the natural rock walls, as well as fragments of painted plaster and well-preserved graves with their deposits, mostly dating to the 5th century AD. This allows a far better understanding of the original organisation of the hypogeal spaces and visual appearance of the whole catacomb. The students who participated in the excavation were supported by the programme Erasmus Plus.

JGU students in Sicily

We are currently organising the participation of students from the University of Mainz to the next campaign, to be expectedly carried out in October and November 2021 in collaboration with the University of Hradec Králové. Further information will be published on this web-page.

Contacts

Michelle Beghelli

mibeghel@uni-mainz.de

Univ.-Prof. Dr. Vasiliki Tsamakda

tsamakda@uni-mainz

 

Die Katakomben und ihr Umfeld im Südosten von Sizilien (4. - 9. Jh.)

Eine einzigartige Landschaft mit einer einzigartigen Geschichte

Unsere Abteilung startet ein internationales kollaboratives Projekt über die spätantiken Katakomben auf Sizilien, ihren Kontext, ihre Nutzung und ihre spätere Wiederverwendung. Ziel ist die Weiterführung der Ausgrabungen, die bereits in Arbeit sind, und die Organisation eines umfassenden und interdisziplinären Forschungsprojekts.

Die Katakomben im Südosten von Sizilien

In der Provinz von Ragusa, im Südosten von Sizilien, sind hunderte von Grabstellen bekannt, verteilt auf unzählige Katakomben, bestehend aus Höhlen, die in die kalkhaltigen Felsformationen dieser Region eingehauen sind. Diese ungewöhnlichen Orte machen die Provinz Ragusa zu einem einzigartigen Landstrich innerhalb Europas, nicht nur aufgrund ihrer hohen Konzentration, sondern auch wegen ihres besonderen historischen Kontextes. Von der Spätantike bis ins frühe Mittelalter haben die verschiedensten Völker mit unterschiedlichen Kulturen und Sprachen dieses Gebiet beherrscht, bewohnt bzw. mitbewohnt: spätrömische, germanische, byzantinische und arabische Bevölkerungsgruppen. Zusätzlich war die Region um Ragusa ein umkämpftes Grenzgebiet zwischen dem vandalischen Königreich, dem Römischen Reich und Odoakers italienischem Königreich.

Die größten Katakomben haben eine sehr weite Ausdehnung und weisen charakteristische architektonische Strukturen auf mit Haupt- und Nebengängen und kleinen und größeren säulengestützten Kammern, die teilweise mit skulpturalen Dekorationen und Inschriften versehen oder in denen Spuren von Bemalung erhalten geblieben sind. Die Grabstellen, die in den vorhandenen Fels gehauen wurden, bedecken entweder in Form von Grabsteinen den Boden oder, in unterschiedlichen Schichten, die gesamte Wand vom Boden bis zur Decke. Es gibt ebenso Gräber der privilegierten Bevölkerungsschicht mit baldachinartigen Überbauten, oder Arkosolien, oder schmale überwölbte Kammern als Bestattungsort für zwei oder vier Verstorbene.

Forschungsarbeiten an den Katakomben und ihrem Kontext

Bis jetzt ist die Kenntnislage über diese Region eher dürftig, da bisher auch nur wenig Fläche ausgegraben wurde. Die verfügbaren Daten rekrutieren überwiegend aus grundlegenden graphischen Dokumentationen und Zeichnungen, die bei gelegentlichen Oberflächen-Surveys angefertigt wurden. So gibt es bis jetzt keine umfassende Studie zu diesem einmaligen Gebiet: es ist sogar unmöglich die genaue Anzahl der Katakomben und Grabstätten zu bestimmen, welche aller Wahrscheinlichkeit höher ist als bisher angenommen. Die exakte Position und die Gesamtmenge von Grabfeldern und Gräbern muss systematisch erfasst werden, weiterhin die Form und die originalen Baustrukturen als auch die verschiedenen Bau- und Grablegungsperioden. Weitere grundlegende, die Katakomben betreffende Aspekte bedürfen einer genauen Betrachtung, wie Ausgrabungstechnik oder der wirtschaftliche Kontext der Handwerker, die die dem jeweiligen Sektor tätig waren, die Definition und Entwicklungsstrategien der Begräbnisareale sowie deren spätere Wiederverwendung als Unterkünfte oder Viehställe, die Identifizierung und soziale Zuordnung der Grabbesitzer, die Bedeutung der Katakomben für die Landschaft, ihre räumliche Beziehung zu anderen zeitgleichen Ansiedlungen (Dörfern oder oberirdischen Friedhöfen usw.), die Infrastrukturen (Straßen, Wasserressourcen, Häfen, Märkte) und die unmittelbare Umgebung dieser Begräbnisareale usw.

Diese und viele andere Punkte werden erwartungsgemäß im Fokus einer großangelegten, teilweise schon in Vorbereitung begriffenen Untersuchung stehen, die mit der Landesamt für Archäologie und Denkmalpflege Siziliens und der Universität von Hradec Králové in der Tschechischen Republik zusammenarbeitet. Das von der DFG geförderte Programm “Aufbau internationaler Kooperationen” hat es möglich gemacht, bereits Kontakte aufzubauen und vorbereitende Kooperationsmaßnahmen mit unseren internationalen Partnern abzuschließen.

Neue archäologische Ausgrabungen

Unter archäologischem und historischem Blickpunkt ist die massive Präsenz von Katakomben in ländlichen Gebieten ein weiteres außergewöhnliches Charakteristikum der Ragusa-Region. Ein eindrückliches Beispiel, schon allein durch seine Größe und archäologische Bedeutung, findet sich in Scorrione, in der Nähe von Modica. Im Oktober und November 2020 unternahm die Universität Hradec Králové die erste Ausgrabungskampagne mit Schwerpunkt auf dem Areal von Hypogäum D und E. Die Hauptaufgaben bestanden in der stratigraphischen Untersuchung des gesamten Hypogäums D, sowohl im Innen- als auch außen im Außenbereich der Hauptgrabkammer. Eine darauf aufbauende stratigraphische Abfolge für die Entstehung, den Gebrauch und die spätere Auflassungder Grabfläche konnte so rekonstruiert werden. Diese Art der Datenerfassung für Katakomben im ländlichen Bereich ist praktisch einzigartig und zeigt das noch auszuschöpfende Potential für die weitere Erforschung dieses Areals, welches eine weitere Anzahl von Hypogäen einschließt, die einer systematischen archäologischen Untersuchung bedürfen. Die Kampagne führte auch zur Entdeckung und Aufnahme von verschiedenen architektonischen Strukturen, welche in die natürlichen Felswände hineingebaut oder gehauen wurden, als auch von Fragmenten bemalten Stucks und von sehr gut erhaltenen Gräbern mit sterblichen Überresten, überwiegend datiert in das 5. Jh. n. Chr. Diese Ergebnisse erlauben ein besseres Verständnis für die ursprüngliche Organisation der Areale der Hypogäen und für die Erscheinungsformen der gesamten Katakomben. Die Studierenden, die an den Ausgrabungen teilgenommen haben, wurden vom Erasmus-Plus Programm unterstützt.

JGU Studierende auf Sizilien

Wir organisieren gerade die Teilnahme von Studierenden der JGU Mainz an der nächste Kampagne, welche hoffentlich im Oktober und November 2021 in Zusammenarbeit mit der Hradec Králové Universität stattfinden kann. Weitere Informationen werden auf dieser Webseite veröffentlicht.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Veröffentlicht am | Veröffentlicht in Forschung